NEW MILLS
Torr Mill
Torr Mill

 

TORR MILL

Torr Mill showing the leat

Torr Mill was originally built by Samuel Schofield some time before 1794. Unusually the mill remained in the ownership of the Schofield family throughout its history. It was built beside the confluence of the rivers Goyt and Sett in order to take advantage of the ready supply of water power. The original mill was occupied by Samuel Schofield for cotton spinning. In 1829 the company became Samuel Schofield and Son.

‘The body of Samuel Schofield, of Warksmoor House, lies in a vault covered by a massive tomb (in the Methodist Chapel graveyard). The Schofields were big folk in their day. They built Warksmoor House and Torr Mills when Newtown was still a moor. Their descendants now reside in Liverpool. When the present chapel was built they carried on business as cotton spinners.’ New Mills Wesleyanism, Seth Evans

In 1834, the premises and Warksmoor House were rented, for fifty pounds per annum to John Sheldon who continued a business of cotton spinning until on 22nd October 1838, a fire started in the attic of the mill and completely consumed the buildings and all the machinery of cotton spinning on the site. The effects on the work force were devastating.

‘The late calamitous and destructive fire, which took place a few weeks ago, at Mr Sheldon’s mill has thrown many industrious families out of work and reduced them to great distress and want.’ Stockport Advertiser.

Soon after this devastating fire rebuilding work began and a new far bigger mill was built on the site. It appears that this new structure used a combination of water and steam power, because in 1846 a chimney and boiler made by Butterley were added. For the next ten years the mill was occupied by Josiah Mellor and John Roberts who carried out cotton spinning on the site. John Roberts also occupied Warksmoor house for this period. By 1848, the mill contained 20 mules and 13,792 spindles,
In 1857 the premises were taken over by Messrs Hibbert and Alcock cotton spinners.
They appear to have been good employers; in 1860 they ‘regaled the hands in their employ to an excellent tea at the Queens Arms Inn.’

The water wheel of Torr Mill was fed by water carried down a leat which ran under the Queens Road Bridge, parallel with the River Goyt. The weir and water control gear at the head of the leat are all still in place, as are the ruins of the water mans cottage. The water was channelled in a large wooden trough, from the leat over the River Sett and into water wheel pit, where it poured into a series of metal troughs on the water wheel, turning the wheel and so driving a series of belts and pulleys within the mill. The rotation of the wheel poured the water from the troughs as others filled and the spent water passed down a long underground tunnel called a race before emerging to rejoin the River Goyt beyond the Union Bridge. Recovered sections of the water wheel reveal it to have been of considerable size.

In 1860 a young girl in the employ of Messrs Hibbert and Alcock was crossing the river by means of walking along the edge of the water trough, when she slipped off and drowned in the river.

Torr Mill

It appears all Messrs Hibbert and Alcock’s work ceased at the mill in 1871. In June 1873 the Torr Mill Spinning Company was launched as a co-operative venture. They gained an early assurance from the Schofield family that they would sell both the mill and the engine at a fixed price.

‘on Thursday evening last, a public meeting convened by placard, was held at the Public Hall, for the purpose of hearing the report of the Provisional Board, and with a view of acting upon it or otherwise. There was a moderate attendance, and John Taylor, Esq., presided. It was decided to register the company forthwith, and the capital to begin with is four thousand pounds. The Board gave their report of having examined the mill in the Tor, and taken the preliminary steps toward obtaining the premises. It was resolved to issue 2,000 shares at five pounds each, which could be taken and paid for at the rate of five shillings upon allotment, and five shillings per month afterwards till the share was paid up. The articles of association are being drawn up, and shortly a prospectus will be issued.’ 22-8-1873.

Manchester Times 11-03-1843‘We understand that there is now every probability of an early start at Torr Mill, by the New Mills Cotton Spinning Co. the shares are being rapidly taken up, some 80 or 90 were taken up last Saturday, whilst 50 others were taken up by one gentleman alone. It will prove a source of much good to the township, whose trade is at present rather low.’ 22-4-1874

By the middle of 1874 they were ready to open for business and soon after had a capital of around twelve thousand pounds. The first manager was John Coup, followed by William H. Woods with the John Pollett as secretary followed by Richard Clayton and the W. R. Shackleton.

In 1883, the Torr Mills company were force to threaten Mr Walmsley, the contractor engaged to build the Union Road Bridge with an injunction after the contractors had blocked the river. Presumably whilst they dug out the foundations of the bridge. The raised water levels had most likely caused a flooding of the lower floor/cellar of the mill.

On 27th of September 1883, the delivery to the Torr Mill Company of a large boiler of considerable weight attracted much attention as it was draw into the town by a traction engine. it was manufactured by Messrs. Daniel Adamson and Co., of Dukinfield.

Late in the decade the co-operative money was withdrawn from the Torr Mills Cotton Spinning Co. Ltd and a great many investors lost money. It seems that the management had been speculating on the price of Cotton, buying in bales when they judged the price to be low and selling later at a profit. However, a sudden collapse in the price of raw Cotton was their undoing. Astonished share holders found the mill had enough Cotton bales stored in the warehouse for 5 years production all of which were virtually valueless. The management team claimed such speculation was common practice. Whether it was or not, it bankrupt the company and caused great hardship among local investors. Following the failure of the co-operative, one Harold Slack ran the mill for a period, but also found it unviable and around 1900 all cotton spinning machinery was removed from the building. Surprisingly an extension or tower appears to have been added in 1898.

In 1904, the Linotow Yarn Company Ltd, a company of yarn spinners occupied the premises. By 1911 they too had moved on and Warburton and Arrow smith a company of fustian cutters moved into the mill. They employed around seventy people most of them girls.

 

In the early hours of December 2nd 1912 Torr Mill caught fire for a second time. Despite great effort the mill could not be saved and the entire mill was gutted by a fire described as ‘the largest conflagration seen in New Mills.’ The 5 storey mill still owned by the Schofield family was completely destroyed and as the day of the cotton spinning industry was largely coming to a close no attempt was ever made to rebuild on the site.


Torr Mill burnsTorr Mill fire


In 1974 the ruins of the mill were cleared up and the Torrs were reopened to the public. The ruins continue to attract the attention of visitors though few realise the scale of the massive building that once stood here.


That might have been that for the story of Torr Mill, the building and the site, but in 2006 plans were drawn up to establish an hydro electric generating plant on the River Goyt. The electricity generated by taking advantage of the ten foot drop created by the original mill weir. The scheme calls for the installation of an Archimedes screw into a position beside the weir. The head of the screw just below the water level at the top of the weir and the screw lying at 22° roughly into what was the original water wheel pit. Work to dig out the area began in 2008 and a surprising amount of archeology was revealed. It appears that nothing from below the ground surface was removed from the site following the fire. See the gallery for pictures of what was found.

 

A full history of the ownership of Torr Mill and of the area of the Torrs it occupies is contained in a document of 1883. The document itself was drawn up as an agreement between the Local Board and Schofield family to allow the Union bridge to cross their property within the Torrs. The first page of the three page parchment document establishes the early history of the land occupied by Torr Mill. The land was originally owned by John Badderley Ratcliffe, John Cresswell and Anne his wife and John Bennett and purchased from them by Randle Taylor, Yeoman on 17th May 1784. The land is referred to as lying beneath the Old Croft, which is undoubtedly the area now occupied by houses and shops to the top of Union Road.
There is a reference in the document to buildings already on the site. But perhaps most interesting is the reference to a Paper Drying House, suggesting the site was already being used for manufacturing even at this early date. It is possible that the Paper Drying House was in use by John Barnes who began his occupation of Torr Top Mill as a paper manufacturer. His mill stood in the area below the Chain horse House and should not be confused with Torr Mill.
Randle Taylor changed the Torr Mill site to cotton production. It is also worth noting that Randle Taylor was granted the right to excavate a road, suggesting he planned to greatly increase productivity. In 1804, the land and premises passed to Samuel Schofield of Warksmoor House who began a process of expansion on the site that continued for many years until the mill was destroyed by fire on 22nd October 1838. The premises were rebuilt by John Schofield who took the opportunity to modernise adding the chimney and supplying steam power to the later mill. The family appear to have ceased working the mill themselves after the death of Samuel Schofield in 1830 and from that time, a series of tenants occupied the buildings until their eventual destruction in the fire of 1912.
 
Schofield Family Tree - copyright 
 
 
Other information on document.
Samuel Schofields will was proved at Lichfield 23-12-1830. To his wife Ann he left a £20 annuity free of taxes. To the sons he left the factory.
John Schofield, Gentleman of the City of Liverpool.
Samuel Kenworthy Schofield, of Waterloo in the County of Lancaster.
Schofield James Radford, of the City of Liverpool, Corn merchant.
Edwin Carrington, Glass Manufacturer.
James Anderson, Timber Merchant.
Robert Hugh Unsworth of Cartwell, Grange over Sands, Lancaster.
Mary Ann Schofield, of Melbourne, Australia, Spinster.
 
 
THE DOCUMENT
 
An Indenture of Lease for Torr Mill
 
This Indenture made the thirty first day of December one thousand right hundred and eighty three Between John Schofield of the City of Liverpool Gentleman of the first part, Samuel Kenworthy Schofield of Waterloo in the county of Lancaster Gentleman of the second part. The said Samuel Kenworthy Schofield James Radford of the City of Liverpool, corn merchant and Francis Anderson of the same place Timber Merchant of the third part. Edwin Carrington of the same place Glass Manufacturer and Alice his wife of the fourth part. The said John Schofield and Edwin Carrington of the fifth part. Mary Ann Schofield of Melbourne, Australia, spinster of the sixth part. Robert Hugh Unsworth of Cartwell, Grange over Sands in the said county of Lancaster Gentleman and Mary his wife of the said district of the seventh part, the said John Schofield of the eighth part and The Local Board for the District of New Mills in the county of Derby acting as the Urban authority for the said district hereinafter called the said Urban authority of the ninth part.
Whereas by an indenture dated the 17th day of May one thousand seven hundred and eighty four made between John Badderley Ratcliffe, John Cresswell and Anne his wife, and John Bennett of the one part and Randle Taylor of the other. All that plot, piece or parcel of land as the same was then set out in Whitle hamlet in the said County of Derby being part of an estate there called Torr Top and lying at the south end of a certain close called Old Croft at the bottom thereof adjoining the rivers or streams of water known by the names of the Kinder and Goyt at or near a place where the same unite and bounded on the northerly and westerly sides thereof by the rocky part of the same close and on the southerly and easterly sides thereof by the said rivers or streams of water or one of them and contained by estimation in length along the upper part thereof from water to water fourteen rods or perches of Cheshire measure or thereabouts together with the streams of water adjoining thereto and also with liberty and power for him the said Randle Taylor his executers administrators or assigns to take and divert the said streams or either of them to any work building or buildings already erected or which should thereafter be erected by the said Randle Taylor upon the said plot of land and also the free use of passing and repassing by over or through the way or road to be made by the said Randle Taylor along the northerly side of the building called the “Paper Dryinghouse” in pursuance of the power and covenant therein contained were / except therein is excepted / demised by the said John Badderley Ratcliffe John Cresswell and Anne his wife and John Bennett unto the said Randle Taylor his executers administrators and assigns from the twenty fifth day of March then last past for the term of nine hundred and ninety nine years subject to the payment of certain yearly rent of four pounds and thirteen shillings and performance of certain covenants conditions and agreements then expressed reserved and contained. 
And Whereas by an indenture of underlease dated the second day of June one thousand eight hundred and four and made between the said Randle Taylor of the one part and Samuel Schofield of the other part for the considerations therein mentioned all that the said plot of land and all and singular other the premises comprised in and demised by the herein before recited indenture. And all and every the Cotton Mill and cotton mills edifices and other buildings then or at any time thereafter erected thereon were demised by the said Randle Taylor to the said Samuel Schofield his executers administrators and assigns from the twenty ninth day of September the next for and during and unto the full end and term of nine hundred and seventy years thence next ensuing and fully to be complete and ended under and subject nevertheless to the observance and performance of all and every the reservations covenants conditions and agreements in the said herein before recited indenture contained and subject to the payment during the said nine hundred and seventy years unto the said Randle Taylor his executers administrators and assigns of the clear yearly rent or sum of one hundred pounds.
And Whereas the said Samuel Schofield duly made and executed his last Will and Testament in writing dated the twenty eighth day of December one thousand eight hundred and twenty six whereby after making certain specific devises and bequests. He devised unto his three sons Robert Schofield, the said John Schofield and Samuel Schofield (intervalid) all that and those herein described plot of land and premises to hold the same to them his said sons their heirs executors administrators and assigns as tenants in common and not as joint tenants subject nevertheless to the payment of the rents so reserved in respect of the premises aforesaid. And also subject to and charged and chargeable with the annuity of Twenty pounds as herein after mentioned. And the said Testators bequeathed onto his wife and her assigns for the term of her natural life the said annuity or sum of Twenty pounds free from taxes to be payable as therein mentioned and of the said Cotton Mill or factory warehousing and cottages and the said testator charged the said premises with the payment of the same accordingly. And the said testator appointed his said Wife and his said sons Robert Schofield and John Schofield Executrix and Executors of that his Will.
And Whereas the said Samuel Schofield died on the seventh day of May one thousand eight hundred and thirty and his said Will was proved on the twenty third day of December following in the ecclesiastical court of the Diocese of Lichfield and Coventry by the said Robert Schofield one of the executors thereof.
And Whereas by an indenturedated the second day of January one thousand eight hundred and thirty three and made between the Samuel Schofield of the first part Robert Schofield and John Schofield of the second part and John Beard shopkeeper of the third part. For the consideration therein mentioned the said Samuel Schofield did thereby assign and the said Robert Schofield and John Schofield did and each of them did assign unto the said John Beard his executors administrators and assigns all that the said plot of land and premises mentioned and described in and demised unto the said Samuel Schofield testator by the said here before recited Indenture of underlease to hold the same unto the said John Beard his executors administrators and assigns for all the residue of the said term of nine hundred and seventy years granted as aforesaid subject to the future payment of the said rent of One hundred pounds and performance and observance of the several covenants and conditions in the said firstly hereinbefore recited Indenture reserved and contained and subject also to the payment of the said annuity of Twenty pounds. And it was by the now reciting Indenture agreed and declared between the said parties thereto that the said John Beard his executors administrators and assigns should stand and be possessed of the same hereditaments and premises unto the trusts following that was to say as to one undivided moiety or equal half part thereof unto trust for the sole use and benefit of the said Robert Schofield his executors administrators and assigns and to assign and dispose of the same from time to time in such manner as he or they should appoint and in the meantime to permit him and them peaceably and quietly to posses the same and receive the rents and profits thereof for his own use and benefit absolutely and as to the other and remaining undivided moiety thereof unto trust for the sole use and benefit of the said John Schofield his executors administrators and assigns in like manner
And Whereas the said Mary Schofield widow of the testator Samuel Schofield died on the …5th… day of …March… one thousand eight hundred and …forty… And was buried at …St Georges Chapel, New Mills

And Whereas
the said Robert Schofield made and executed his last Will and Testament in writing bearing the date on or about the twenty eighth day of January one thousand eight hundred and thirty five wherein he devised and bequeathed all his share and interest in the factory and land situate and being in New Mills aforesaid to his wife Mary Schofield for her life and at her decease the testator gave the same share which in the now reciting Will was referred to as bequeathed to him by his late father unto his the testators children when the younger should reach the age of twenty one years if they lived so long and then he ordered the same to be sold and the money divided amongst them share and share alike and the testator appointed Thomas Roberts now deceased and the said John Schofield executors and his said wife executrix of his said Will.
And Whereas the said testator died on the first day of February one thousand eight hundred and thirty five without having altered or worked his said Will which on the seventh day of September in the same year was proved by the said executors and executrix in the consistory court of Chester and on the twenty first day of September one thousand eight hundred and thirty seven was also proved by them in the consistory court of Lichfield.
And Whereas by an Indenture dated the sixth day of July one thousand eight hundred and forty nine and made between the said John Beard of the first part the said John Schofield and Mary Schofield as the surviving executor and executrix under the hereinbefore recited Will of the said Robert Schofield deceased of the second part and the said John Schofield of the third part for the consideration therein mentioned it was witnessed that the said John Beard at the request and by the appointment of the said John Schofield and Mary Schofield as the executors and executrix as aforesaid did assign unto the said John Schofield and Mary Schofield their executors administrators and assigns all that undivided moiety or equal half part or share the whole into two equal parts being considered as divided of and in all and singular the plot of land mills or factory buildings cottages or dwelling houses shop gearing machinery warehousing and other the premises assigned unto the said John Beard by the herein recited indenture of the second day of January one thousand eight hundred and thirty three for the residue of the said term of nine hundred and seventy years therein to hold the same unto the said John Schofield and Mary Schofield their executors administrators and assigns as such executors and executrix as aforesaid for all the residue of the said term of nine hundred and seventy years upon the trust and subject to the powers and to be applied and disposed of according to the direction and trusts of the said recited Will of the said Robert Schofield deceased subject nevertheless to the payment of a proportionate part of the said yearly rent of one hundred pounds and all the payments in respect of the said premises and to the several covenants conditions and agreements to be observed and performed in respect of the same premises and by the now reciting Indenture it was further witnessed that for the same considerations the said John Beard at the request and by the appointment of the said John Schofield did assign unto the said John Schofield his executors administrators and assigns. All that remaining undivided moiety or equal half part of and in all and singular the plot of land, mill or factory buildings, cottages or dwelling houses, shop, gearing machinery, warehousing rights privileges and other the premises assigned unto the said John Beard by the hereinbefore recited Indenture of the second day of January one thousand eight hundred and thirty three for all the residue of the said term of nine hundred and seventy years as therein mentioned. To hold the same unto the said John Schofield in his own right his executors administrators and assigns absolutely for all the residue of the said term of nine hundred and seventy years subject nevertheless to the payment of a proportionate part of the said yearly rent of one hundred pounds and all other payments in respect of the said premises and to the several covenants conditions and agreements to be observed and performed in respect of the same premises.
And Whereas the said Robert Schofield had four children only namely Thomas Roberts Schofield the said Samuel Kenworthy Schofield and Alice Schofield all of whom had attained their respective ages of twenty one years and John Schofield who died in the month of October one thousand eight hundred and thirty four an infant of the age of ten weeks or thereabouts.
And Whereas by an Indenture dated the fourth day of August one thousand eight hundred and sixty three and made between the said Alice Schofield of the first part the said Edwin Carrington of the second part and the said Samuel Kenworthy Schofield, James Radford and Francis Anderton of the third part after reciting that a marriage was then intended to be shortly solemnized between the said Alice Schofield and Edwin Carrington. It was witnessed that she the said Alice Schofield with the approbation of the said Edwin Carrington did grant convey and assign and the said Edwin Carrington did confirm unto the said Samuel Kenworthy Schofield, James Radford and Francis Anderton their heirs executors administrators and assigns (inter valid) all that the one equal third part or share or other the part or share to which the said Alice Schofield was or might become entitled of in or to the said share of the said Robert Schofield deceased of and in the factory lands hereditaments and premises in his said hereinbefore recited Will referred to or which might have become subject to the disposition in the same Will contained in favour of his children and of and in the money to arise from the sale of the same share under or to give effect to the provision or direction in that behalf in the same Will contained and of and in the immediate rents and profits thereof after the decease of the said Mary Schofield to hold the same unto and to the use of the said Samuel Kenworthy Schofield, James Radford and Francis Anderson their heirs executors administrators and assigns respectively according to their respective natures and tenures subject nevertheless to the life estate or interest therein respectively of the said Mary Schofield. And it was by the now reciting Indenture declared that the said Samuel Kenworthy Schofield, James Radford and Francis Anderson or the survivor or survivors of them or the heirs executors or administrators respectively of such survivors or survivor should with the consent in writing of the said Edwin Carrington and Alice his wife or the survivor of them during their lives sell the same respective parts or shares either together or in parcels and either by public auction or private contract and for the purposes aforesaid or any of them execute and do all such assurances and things or he should think fit.
And Whereas the said Mary Schofield died on the twenty fifth day of February one thousand eight hundred and seventy five and was buried at St James Cemetery, Liverpool leaving the said John Schofield her executor, her surviving.
And Whereas the said Thomas Roberts Schofield duly made and executed his last Will and Testament in writing bearing the date the fifteenth day of October one thousand eight hundred and sixty three whereby appointed his Uncle the said John Schofield and the said Edwin Carrington Executors and Trustees and gave and devised to them their executors administrators and assigns all the real and personal estate which he might be possessed of or entitled to at the time of his death with permission to sell any part of such real or personal estate as they might consider it beneficial to do upon trust to pay his debts and subject thereto pay the income to his wife Mary Schofield as long as she remained his widow and continued to live within twenty five miles of Liverpool, but in case the said Mary Schofield should remarry then to pay her an annuity of two hundred pounds and stand possessed of the trust premises upon trust for his (the testators) child or children which should be then living and the lawful issue of any child or children which might be dead leaving issue such issue to take only the parents share.
And Whereas the testator duly executed a codicil to his said last Will and testament but which said codicil did not in any way affect the premises the subject of these presents.
And Whereas the said testator died on the fourteenth day of June one thousand eight hundred and sixty four and his Will was duly proved in the district registry at Liverpool of the Probate Division of Her Majesty’s High Court of Justice on the twenty eighth day of January following.
And Whereas the said testator had one child only and no more namely the said Mary Ann Schofield party hereto.
And Whereas the said testators widow Mary Schofield has since remarried she having on the second day of March one thousand eight hundred and seventy one at St Johns Church, Longsight near Manchester intermarried with the said Robert Hugh Unsworth and she and the said Robert Hugh Unsworth being satisfied that the residue of the said testators real and personal estate is of ample value for securing the payment of her said annuity they have agreed to join in these presents for the purpose and in a manner hereinafter appearing.
And Whereas the said Urban authority intend constructing a bridge and road leading from New Mills to Newtown across a place there called the Torrs and they have applied to the said several persons parties hereto of the first seven parts to grant an easement over the plot of land containing four hundred and forty three square yards hereinafter described being part of the before mentioned plot of land containing fourteen roods demised by the secondly hereinbefore recited Indenture of the twenty second day of June one thousand eight hundred and four for the purposes hereinafter mentioned.

Now this Indenture witnesseth
that in pursuance of the said Agreement and in consideration of the premises. The said John Schofield as the surviving executor under the Will of the late Robert Schofield deceased as to one moiety of and in the hereditaments hereinafter mentioned the whole into two equal parts being considered as divided and by the direction and with the consent and approbation of the said parties hereto of the second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth and seventh parts testified by their being parties to and severally executing these presents doth hereby grant. And the said Samuel Kenworthy Schofield, James Radford and Francis Anderson as such trustees as aforesaid as to one third part of one half part of and in the same premises and at the request and by and with the consent and approbation of the said Edwin Carrington and Alice his wife testified as aforesaid. Do hereby respectively grant and confirm. And the said Samuel Kenworthy Schofield, Edwin Carrington and Alice his wife and Mary Ann Schofield as beneficial owners Do hereby also respectively grant and confirm. And the said John Schofield and Edwin Carrington as trustees under the hereinbefore recited Will of the said Thomas Roberts Schofield. Do hereby respectively grant and confirm. And the said Robert Hugh Unsworth and Mary his wife for the purpose of releasing the said hereditaments and premises from the payment of the said annuity of two hundred pounds so given to the said Mary Unsworth by the hereinbefore recited Will of the said Thomas Roberts Schofield and at the request of the said Urban authority do hereby release. And the said John Schofield in his own right and as beneficial owner as to the remaining moiety in the said hereditaments and premises Doth hereby grant to the said Urban authority full and free liberty and right to construct columns pillars, supports and arches necessary for forming a viaduct to connect the town or village of New Mills with the town and village of Newtown in and upon any part or parts of

All
that plot piece or parcel of the land containing four hundred and forty three superficial square yards situate at or near Torr Mill within New Mills aforesaid being part of the said plot of land containing fourteen roods mentioned and described in the hereinbefore recited Indenture of the seventeenth day of May one thousand seven hundred and eighty four and which said plot of land is more particularly described in the plan or ground plot thereof drawn in the margin of these presents and therein edged pink. Together with full and free liberty for the said Urban authority from time to time and at all times hereafter to enter upon the land of the said John Schofield in order to repair amend and maintain the said viaduct in such manner and materials as occasion shall require the said Urban authority making compensation to the said John Schofield for any damage or injury they may occasion by reason of such entry.

To hold
the same right and privilege hereby granted expressed or intended so to be unto the said Urban authority for all the residue now to come and unexpired of the said term of nine hundred and seventy years and for all other the estate term and interest of them the said several persons parties hereto of the first seven parts therein or hereto at the rent and under subject to the conditions in the said Indenture of the twenty second day of June one thousand eight hundred and four reserved and contained and which on the part of the Lessee are or ought to be paid observed and performed.

Provided always
And it is hereby agreed and declared that nothing herein contained shall be deemed or taken to vest in the said Urban authority the beneficial interest in the said piece of land hereinbefore described or to effect the rights of the said parties hereto of the first, second, third and fifth parts to the same save and except and so far as may be necessary for giving effect to the grant hereby made.

And
the said Urban authority do hereby Covenant with the said parties hereto of the first, second, third and fifth parts that they will not in any way interfere with or impede the existing flow of the river Goyt to and from the mill and premises called the Torr Mills except so far as the same may be impeded by the construction of the abutments, columns, pillars, supports and arches the subject of the grant hereby made nor in the execution of their works interfere with or impede the access to the said Mill and other premises, but will conduct the same so as to occasion as little inconvenience to the tenants and occupiers as possible. And the said John Schofield hereby acknowledges the right of the said Urban authority to the production of documents of title mentioned in the schedule hereto and to delivery of copies thereof and hereby undertakes for the safe custody thereof. And the said Samuel Kenworthy Schofield, James Radford and Francis Anderson hereby respectively acknowledge the right of the said Urban authority to the production of the hereinbefore recited Indenture of the fourth day of August one thousand eight hundred and sixty three and to delivery of copies thereof and hereby undertake for the safe custody hereof
In witness whereof the said parties to these presents have hereunto set heir hands and seals and the said Urban authority have hereunto affixed their common seal the day and year first above mentioned.
 
The Schedule before referred to
 
17th May          1784
22nd June          1804
2nd January       1833    The hereinbefore recited Indentures of these respective dates.
6th July             1849
 
Names of signatories
 
John Schofield
Samuel Schofield
Francis Anderson
James Radford
Edwin Carrington
Alice Carrington
Robert Hugh Unsworth
Mary Unsworth
Mary Ann Schofield
 
Stamp dated 28/2/84
 

Blanks on original document filled in blue

A walk through the Torrs could be dangerous. There were many drownings 24-4-1874